Travel Channel’s Brian Unger travels back in time to a New Orleans Jazz social hall

Travel Channel’s Brian Unger Travels Back In Time To A New Orleans Jazz Social Hall

Brian Unger and a group of locals time travel to Texas in the early 1930s, hot on the trail of America’s most infamous couple: Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker. First stop, Hargraves Café in Dallas, the restaurant where Bonnie once worked as a teen before Barrow lured her into a life of crime. Next, the group hops into a vintage Ford V8 (Barrow’s ride of choice) to visit the old Barrow family home and filling station as it transforms back to the 1930s. Unger busts a few popular myths about the couple and visits the sites of a botched holdup at Eubanks Hardware store, the Texas bank heist and the fatal shooting of a deputy sheriff – all culminating with the duo’s violent deaths in Louisiana. Next, Unger heads to New Orleans where he and his guests witness the birth of the only truly American musical art form: jazz. The locals meet in Congo Square, a musical melting pot where diverse music styles would later fuse into jazz. The group enjoys a private performance by famous jazz trombonist, Delfeayo Marsalis. Marsalis strikes up the band to show them the difference between jazz and its musical ancestors. Then, Unger leads the locals to the other side of Lake Pontchartrain to visit an early 20th century African-American society hall where early jazz greats honed their skills. One of Unger’s guests, jazz singer Leah Rucker, takes the stage for a smoky rendition of an old classic. The tour ends, as it should, aboard the riverboat Natchez, as the group discovers how jazz spread up the Mississippi. New episode premieres Thursday, June 25 at 8:00pm ET/PT.

Travel Channel’s Brian Unger travels back in time to a New Orleans Jazz social hall

Brian Unger and a group of locals time travel to Texas in the early 1930s, hot on the trail of America’s most infamous couple: Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker. First stop, Hargraves Café in Dallas, the restaurant where Bonnie once worked as a teen before Barrow lured her into a life of crime. Next, the group hops into a vintage Ford V8 (Barrow’s ride of choice) to visit the old Barrow family home and filling station as it transforms back to the 1930s. Unger busts a few popular myths about the couple and visits the sites of a botched holdup at Eubanks Hardware store, the Texas bank heist and the fatal shooting of a deputy sheriff – all culminating with the duo’s violent deaths in Louisiana. Next, Unger heads to New Orleans where he and his guests witness the birth of the only truly American musical art form: jazz. The locals meet in Congo Square, a musical melting pot where diverse music styles would later fuse into jazz. The group enjoys a private performance by famous jazz trombonist, Delfeayo Marsalis. Marsalis strikes up the band to show them the difference between jazz and its musical ancestors. Then, Unger leads the locals to the other side of Lake Pontchartrain to visit an early 20th century African-American society hall where early jazz greats honed their skills. One of Unger’s guests, jazz singer Leah Rucker, takes the stage for a smoky rendition of an old classic. The tour ends, as it should, aboard the riverboat Natchez, as the group discovers how jazz spread up the Mississippi. New episode premieres Thursday, June 25 at 8:00pm ET/PT.

Travel Channel’s Brian Unger Travels Back In Time To A New Orleans Jazz Social Hall
Travel Channel’s Brian Unger Travels Back In Time To A New Orleans Jazz Social Hall
Travel Channel’s Brian Unger Travels Back In Time To A New Orleans Jazz Social Hall
Travel Channel’s Brian Unger Travels Back In Time To A New Orleans Jazz Social Hall
Travel Channel’s Brian Unger Travels Back In Time To A New Orleans Jazz Social Hall

Travel Channel’s Brian Unger Travels Back In Time To A New Orleans Jazz Social Hall

Travel Channel’s Brian Unger Travels Back In Time To A New Orleans Jazz Social Hall

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